Stupids (Fetvadd #3)

Find another interview (with ‘Zyklome-A’) from this zine (Fetvadd #1) elsewhere on this website. It was the zine of Magnus Grehn (’16 B.U.H.’ vocalist; brother of Fredrik Grehn, who did Byt Ben zine), Mikael ‘Löken’ Karlsson (’16 B.U.H.’ guitarist; ex ‘Rövsvett’) and Frank Bergsten (’16 B.U.H.’ drummer; ex ‘Rövsvett’); all from Tranås (Sweden). Additional info in the previous post… ‘Löken’ provided more stuff so here’s an interview with the ‘Stupids’ from the 3rd issue (1985).

Brob

I saw the ‘Stupids’ in Belgium at Werner E.’s 50 years anniversary and I talked with Tommy ‘Stupid’ for a while but he didn’t seem to remember me, nor the interview or that we had them on a compilation-tape…

‘I Refuse It’ (from Italy) was in Fetvadd #4 (besides ‘G-Anx’, ‘No Idea?’, mostly Swedish bands). Fetvadd #5 had ‘No Lip’ from Japan, ‘Kafka Prosess’ from Norway…

Mikael ‘Löken’ Karlsson

The ‘Stupids’ were from Ipswich (U.K.)…

[Translation below; by Frank Bergsten – scans/pics provided by Mikael Karlsson]

STUPIDS

Interview conducted by ‘Löken’, answers by Tommy.

The guys come from Ipswich and they’re a three-piece band, and have made three demos, have three songs on Putrid Evil [compilation-7” with ‘Civil Dissident’ & ‘Septic Death’] and now [1985] they released the 8-song EP Violent Nun. We, the Fetvadd shitworkers, think they’re the best hardcore band from the UK. The music’s got a cool, distinct sound, reminiscent of American hardcore; with a hell of a lot aggression. This band shows there’s still hope for the UK scene.

STUPIDS were formed January ‘84 with Tommy [Tom Withers] – guitar/vox, Wolfie [‘Retard’] – bass and Ziggy – drums. Ziggy was thrown out of the band September ‘84 with Tommy taking over the drums and Marty [‘Tuff’, Martin Hawkes] joined on guitar.

What does the name ‘Stupids’ mean to you?

We chose it because it was different and funny. People reacted to the name, but it doesn’t mean anything in particular.

You have a special sound, reminding a lot of American hardcore, how come?

Yes, we’ve got a very US-influenced sound and also an international sound. It shows that USA produces the best hardcore bands. The reason to why we’re inspired by US hardcore is that’s what we listen to mostly, and Tommy is actually from the States but he’s been living in England for a long time.

Your opinions on anarchism, pacifism, squatting, vegetarianism, etc.?

Anarchy is a very complicated issue, and would only be appreciated by very few people. OK, pacifism is pretty useful when I want to jump someone and beat him up like hell.

Are you straight-edge?

Yeah, of course I am, and so are Marty and Wolfie, but we don’t want to be called straight-edge or being labelled in any other way either. Occasionally we have a beer but we never get drunk. But don’t think of straight-edge as some kind of law, it’s just a song by ‘Minor Threat’. We want it to be the way they sing about it, I mean don’t take a lot of drugs and become addicted.

What’s a ‘Stupids’ gig like? How does the crowd respond?

In Ipswich people just stand around looking, saying it was OK. But up north people are slamming and stage-diving.

Are you involved in Greenpeace, animal liberation?

No, but we like what they’re doing.

What do you do when you’re not playing?

Wolfie and I (Tommy) make a fanzine named B.J. Comics. We skate a hell of a lot and write lots of letters.

What about the military service? Will you do it or refuse?

We love the army and will join as soon as possible.

Why did you call your tape Leave Your Ears Behind [1985]?

No particular reason. Marty came up with it one day.

What’s the punk/hardcore scene like in your town and in England?

The scene in Ipswich pretty friendly and the bands are pretty good, but since no band’s communicating with anyone they’re not going anywhere and no out-of-town bands come here to play. But we’ve just started to set up some gigs.

How many times have you played live and with whom?

We’ve played about 15 times, mostly with local bands, but we’ve played with ‘A.Y.S.’, ‘Chaos UK’, ‘Onslaught’, ‘Scum Dribblers’, ‘UK Subs’ and more.

Have you sold a lot of your tapes?

It’s been sold out for a long time, we only made 50 copies. But since then we made more copies for people who wanted it.

Are you a political band? Why/why not?

No, we’re not. We don’t think we’ve got anything new to say which hasn’t already been said by bands like ‘M.D.C.’, etc. Not that we think any different.

Got any problems with cops, nazi-skins, etc.?

No, hardly ever. English punks almost never getting hassled by the police and the nazi-skin movement has almost died out.

Tell us something about your songs.

Most of the lyrics don’t mean anything really. Elephant Man is about that man and his life. When we wrote that song we didn’t want to be funny to impress people or anything like that. We’re really moved when we saw the picture. What Happens Next? is a meaningful song but very hard to explain. This Is The Norm? is about what people expect from you. The Pit is about people who ruin gigs, fighting and causing trouble during the pogo.

What happens in the future. Any plans?

We’ll be on a split-tape with ‘A.Y.S.’ [Admit You’re Shit]? on Mortarhate records [‘Conflict’s Colin Jerwood’s label], which will be out when you read this [That didn’t happen; the ‘A.Y.S.’ recordings appeared on their Expect No Mercy… 7”]. This summer we’ll maybe tour in the UK or Europe.

Do any of you guys skate?

Yes! We like to call ourselves a skateband. It’s our biggest interest outside the band. Well, mostly mine, the other guys have cheap plastic boards. I have a friend called Ed who’s the other serious skater here in Ipswich. We skate a lot together. Other skaters: feel free to write.

What would you like to call your music? (thrash, hardcore, oi, punk)

We really don’t care what people call our music, as long as they don’t call it oi.

Your influences?

Hardcore, thrash, punk-rock, ‘Ramones’, ‘D.R.I., ‘Minor Threat’, ‘Double-O’ [Washington, D.C.], ‘7 Seconds’.

Your favourite bands? Do you like any Swedish punk?

‘Impact Unit’, ‘Siege’, ‘Double-O’, ‘Ramones’, ‘M.I.A.’, Willful Neglect’, ‘G.I.’, ‘76% Uncertain’, ‘Decry’, ‘Negative Approach’. The bands I remember from Sweden are ‘Mob 47’ and ‘Asta Kask’.

Anyone you want to thank?

We want to thank Andrew Fryas, Ed, Dig, John, ‘A.Y.S.’, ‘Löken’, Charlie, Kalv, Bruce Irvine, Simon, Chaz, Mart, Graham, Collin, Hippy, Dune, Bill Ropes, ‘Conflict’, Paul, Maximum Rock’n’Roll and loads of other people I’ve forgot.

Last comments.

We’ve released an 8-song EP on C.O.R. [Tim Bennett’s label Children Of The Revolution] called Violent Nun [1985]. It has 8 songs from the tape Leave Your Ears Behind. If you want it, or the tape, you can write me. Feel free to write for any reason because we answer all mail.

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Archbishop Kebab (Einseitig #1)

I got the first issue (actually just 8 pages) of Einseitig (“one-sided”). No idea how I obtained it but probably from ‘Madness’ Reinhard Vinkelau (‘Störfall Mensch’ drummer), who’s mentioned as the contact. There’s quite a few people listed as contributers: Stefan Honerkamp, Michael Frohoff, Stefan Degen, Ansgar Meyer zu Riemsloh, etc. (all from the Münster area).

Brob

We always did a German and a English version. I don’t remember how many issues we did but I did find #5 [interviews with ‘Kina’ & ‘Fierce’, info on animal activists, etc.]. In the German issue of that, I read Einseitig started by the end of 1989. We quit around 1993. During these years we also organised concerts & festivals in Münster. The zine was done by a group of people, the Einseitig crew: ‘Madness’, ‘Frulle’, ‘Stetze’, ‘Alk’ (‘Bone’), Ansgar, Carsten and me. And we had some guest-writers that changed every issue.

Our background was the HC/punk-scene of the 80s. We met in Münster where we were studying. It was a horrible place at that time and we wanted to change that. So we decided the do a fanzine, organise HC/punk-concerts, etc. The idea of the zine was to do just one page every issue. Later it turned into more. Some of us were also involved in animal-rights activism (see Tarzan And His Gang in #5) and 30 years later we’re still vegetarian/vegan.

Ralf Titzmann

‘Archbishop Kebab’ (Edinburgh, Scotland) was collective playing avant-gardesque/ experimental punky stuff… “Their bass heavy sound has developed to embrace elements of dub, afro-beat and ska to their no wave frenetic post jazzcore”. They also held a “confrontational anarcho-punk perspective”. They got togteher in 1986-87; this interview is done with vocalist Karen in ‘89 (before their first album, Yinferranodgie). The line-up at that time: Karen Jack (vocals/guitar/melodica/sax), Duncan (drums), George (bass), Marcus (guitar), James (fiddle) & Neil Bateman (mandolin; later also in ‘Badgewearer’).

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Radical Noise (Bad English #1)

Bad English was a (most probably one-off) collective zine, coordinated by Makis Kalpakidis from Thessaloniki (Greece). Others involved: Elena Basciu (Firenze, Italy), Jelena Sušac (Osijek, Croatia), Rocco Anghel (bassist of the post-punk band ‘Terror Art’; Craiova, Roumenia), Carlos Revelo (San Cristóbal, Venezuela), Adam Van Slyke (Tampa, Florida), etc. Also my correspondent Jean-Paul ‘Pille’ Weibel (Gecko newsletter/distribution; Luzern, Switzerland) helped out so I might’ve gotten it through him…

‘Radical Noise’ was a band from Istanbul, Turkey with Emre Şahin a.k.a. Pedro Loco (drums; also ‘Genocide Policy’), Serdar ‘The Grind’ Asker (bass; also ‘Genocide Policy’), ‘Seen-an’ Sinan Ünal (guitar; also ‘Genocide Policy’) & Kerem Onan (vocals). They played aggressive HC.

Posted in 1996, Greek zines | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

P.A.I.N. (Punk Shocker #6)

This zine was done by ‘Andy Shocker’ (Andrew S.) from the Durham/Newcastle Upon Tyne region. There were 11 issues released between 1989 and 2005. The following overview is based on the ‘Punk Shocker’ Years 1989 – 2004 zineography that was printed in the last issue…

#1 (1989) was a benefit issue for ‘Tyneside Class War’ & Belfast’s ‘Warzone Collective’. This special ‘Vomit Not Vivisection’ issue contained interviews with ‘Disorder’, ‘Debauchery’, ‘Rhetoric’, ‘Political Asylum’ and ‘Pete Pax’. I saw it on the www: most of the stuff was hand-written and the lay-out sometimes a bit messy (old-school cut-and-paste) but hey, that’s punk! There were also reviews, a report on Blitz in Oslo, plus some humorous and serious bits.

#2 (1990) was the ‘Pay What You Like’ special ‘Booze Not Cruise’ issue: interviews with ‘Hellkrusher’, ‘Mortal Terror’ and ‘Senile Decay’; plus articles & jokes.

#3 (’91) A ‘Hunt Sabs’ benefit. Special ‘A System Which Is Based On Need, Is Far Better Than One Based On Greed’ issue: interviews with ‘Filthkick’, ‘Revulsion’, ‘Genital Deformities’ and ‘Embittered’; plus Gateshead pub & cheese pastie reviews.

#4 (’92) Benefit for Anti-Fascist Action. Special ‘Battle-Scarred Warrior’ issue. Hand-written. Interviews with ‘Attila The Stockbroker’, ‘Armed Relapse’ and ‘The Velvet Underpants’; plus Durham pub & cheese-pastie reviews, football (soccer) & jokes, reviews, artwork.

#5 (’93) Special ‘King of Zines’ issue: interviews with ‘Citizen Fish’ and ‘Bugeyed’; plus Gateshead off-licence (to kill) & chip-shop reviews, Anti-Tory Action article & footy.

#6 (’96) Special ‘The Resurrection’ issue. It mentions “Posiyive Is Boring!!” and “Hardcore and Straight Edge Killed Punk” on the cover. Interviews with ‘P.A.I.N.’ & Ian Bone (Class War); plus ‘Police Bastard’ tour-report, football, reviews and a free bus-ticket. The only issue I seem to find back. And it was typewritten!

#7 (’97) Benefit issue for the sacked ‘Liverpool Dockers’ & ‘Magnet Strikers of Darlington’ (fired after an industrial dispute). Special ‘Sunderland Relegation’ issue: interviews with ‘Red Alert’, ‘Apartment 3G’, ‘The Jockney Rejects’ (Oi/punk) and Alan Shearer (soccer-player); plus reviews.

#8 (’98) Benefit for ‘The Magnet Women’s Support Group’. Special ‘Pick Your King’ issue: interviews with ‘U.K. Subs’ Charlie Harper, ‘G.B.H.’ and ‘Wolfpack’; reviews & columns on punk, politics, football.

#9 (2000) was a split issue with Product fanzine (from Scotland). The first 500 copies came with a free Don’t Bother Me I’m Havin’ A Good Time postcard. It had interviews with ‘Leaterface’ and ‘Stratford Mercenaries’, plus a feature on ‘Turbonegro’, the punk-rock freemasons & reviews.

#10 (2002) The first 500 copies came with a limited edition ‘Darby Crash’ sticker. It was the special ‘It’s For ‘Erberts’ issue; with a huge exclusive ‘Angelic Upstarts’ interview, a feature on ‘The Germs’, a competition & reviews.

#11 (2004) came with a free ‘Poison Idea’/‘The Gits’ gig-poster. The first 500 copies with a limited edition ‘Poison Idea’ postcard. Special ‘No More Nothin’ issue: interviews with ‘Poison Idea’, ‘The Gits’, ‘Sensa Yuma’ and ‘Icons Of Filth’. Plus: articles, rants & stacks of reviews.

Brob

My motivations to do a zine? It was never planned out or set in stone. I enjoyed reading lots of fanzines in the day – such as Raising Hell, Skull & Crossbones, Have A Good Laugh – to name but a few – so I thought ‘Why not give it a go?’. I wanted to cover bands that others didn’t, who I thought were good and had something to say.  I also wanted to inject some humour into punk and publish some interesting articles, as I was (and still am) quite opinionated.  At the time, some zines were quite formulaic and asked the same questions (e.g. ‘When did you form?’) and you’ld see the same bands in the same zines all the time.

Obviously, the zine developed over time. As I said: I didn’t think I’d still be doing it over a 15 year time span.  I ended up doing lots and lots of record- and CD-reviews, which I didn’t plan for, and it did start to take up a lot of time.  I met lots of great people, who I am still in contact with and got to interview some of my favourite bands, who were all really cool!

The influence of punk/ HC on my life… It’s still the sound-track to my life. I probably learned more from ‘Crass’, ‘Icons Of Filth’, ‘Antisect’ and many many more than I ever did at school. I’ve still lots of great friends who I know from ‘the scene’ and I still go to gigs and buy (too many) records.  It’s shaped who I am today.

Andrew S.

‘P.A.I.N.’ (Propaganda And Information Network) – ska-punk with reggae/dub influences supporting anarcho-style rantings – from London, were: John Horabin (vocals & keyboard; also ‘AOS3’), Phil ‘Pain’ Beckett (guitar & vocals), Ozzy ‘Captain Ozbert’ Wilkins (bass & vocals) and ‘Dan the Man Bdlang’, Danny Sylvester (drums & vocals). Some of them had also been in ‘Radical Dance Faction’. This interview was conducted a bit before their LP Oh My God! We’re Doing It! was released (on Inna State, 1996).

Posted in 1996, UK zines | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Vanilla (J’Ai Le Regret A La Joie Mélé #3)

Before Cheval De Troie,  Gérôme Desmaison (Niort, France) published J’Ai Le Regret A La Joie Mélé (dubbed a straight-edge/emo-core zine). He was the guitarist of ‘Alcatraz’ and ‘Peu-Être’ (later vocalist of ‘Amanda Woodward’ & ‘Kiss The Bottle’). I helped distribute both zines through my mailorder.

Gérôme also ran the label Le Brun Le Roux Corporation, together with ‘Ballon’ Laurent Daudin (other ‘Alcatraz’ guitarist). Nowadays he’s a tattoo-artist (and a father), living in Barcelona.

I didn’t get to see the first two issues. #3 (got out in June ’94) had interviews with (French bands) ‘Undone’, ‘Vanilla’ & ‘Bubble’; and (Californian bands) ‘Floodgate’ & ‘Litmus Green’. #4 contained just one interview (with ‘Iconoclast’) and personal bits, plus reviews. #5 (May ’95) featured Sanjam zine, ‘Ananda’, ‘Avail’, ‘Policy Of 3’, ‘Scraps’, ‘Weep’ (Bordeaux, Fra), ‘Bored Way’, + info & contacts.

‘Vanilla’ was an emo band from the Paris region. The band’s 7″ I Can’t Stop Hating This Empty Space was released on Olivier Lépine’s label Laissez-Nous Jouer in 1995. That was recorded with Jean Lebrun (bass) and brothers Yann & Yves Maisonneuve (both ex ‘Ivich’; guitar/vocals and drums/vocals). Alain Vidal (also in ‘Symptom Of Isaac’ & ‘El Vidal Sonido’) joined them later.

[Translation below]

VANILLA has just released their second demo which is very beautiful and their passage on stage left me with very beautiful memories. Thank you for your kind response.

I BELIEVE YOU WERE DOING ANOTHER BAND BEFORE ‘VANILLA’. CAN YOU EXPLAIN THE CHANGE FROM ‘MUNCHIES’ AND PRESENT YOURSELVES BRIEFLY?

Yann: It’s hard to explain the change! In fact, I think we had had enough of it. I wanted to move on to something else. ‘Munchies’ was a band of high-school students. But despite everything, I enjoyed it. And when that pleasure was gone, I thought I should stop. Now I don’t think I was wrong. Regarding a presentation: Jean plays the bass, Yves (my brother) plays the drums and I play the guitar. Yves and I are sharing vocals between the two of us.

WHO IN THE FRENCH SCENE ARE YOU CLOSE TO? WHAT ARE THE BANDS THAT INSPIRE YOU, THAT INFLUENCE YOU, HERE AND ABROAD?

Yann: Myself, I feel close to people with whom I have certain opinions in common. We can’t all have the same ideas on all subjects but to give you some examples: I get along well with the people of ‘Fingerprint’, ‘Undone’, ‘Shatter The Myth’, the guys of [the label] Laissez-Nous Jouer and the people from Orléans, whom I regard as friends and whom I appreciate as humans and as bands. However, I can’t get along with people from ‘Condense’, ‘Burning Head’ or other bands like that. I find their approach questionable and I do not seek affinity with them. So each their seperate way.

As for influences: I think they speak for themselves. We’re not looking to play like this or that group, otherwise we would be talking about outright copying, I think that as far as we’re concerned, the influences are more about vibes and the atmospheres in the songs of the bands that we listen to (‘Downcast’, ‘Still Life’, ‘Moss Icon’, ‘Nation Of Ulysses’). If there’s one thing that we have learned from these bands, it’s that the fact of doing things as we see them. It’s important for us to see a band as a mix of identities and personalities.

Yves: I feel close to bands such as ‘Fingerprint’, ‘Undone’, ‘Shatter The Myth’ but also to people such as Olivier Lépine & Norbert Chomat (Laissez-Nous Jouer), and those I don’t know yet but who may be close to us. These people are the most sincere in my opinion.

Regarding foreigners: that’s difficult, because we only know very little of them. But meetings with these were interesting: ‘Sofa Head’, ‘One By One’. Otherwise, regarding music and influences, let’s mention ‘Downcast (my favourites),‘ Still Life’, the Washington DC scene and many others (‘Jones Very’, etc.). The list is too long to mention all.

ON THE OTHER HAND: ARE THERE, ACCORDING TO YOU, BANDS OR MUSICAL STYLES THAT ADD SOMETHING MUSICALLY TO HC, BUT WHO DON’T STICK TO THE IDEAS BEHIND IT? DON’T YOU FIND THAT A BIG PART OF THE AUDIENCE HAS SOMEWHAT THE SAME ATTITUDE?

Yves: The problem is that hardcore in itself is very eclectic, so different lines of thought exist and sometimes conflict. I actually think there are several HC-scenes; and therefore several audiences. We have to try to present our vision to others.

Yann: Should we state names? In that case see the second question. It’s true that there are two HC-scenes: one DIY and non-profit, the other more professional. But to me, the label of HC-band implies not to demand guarantees for playing or at least being reasonanble. Or this parallel scene is no longer a movement! As for audiences: that’s something else. There are those who, in their heads, got stuck in ‘77 and who believe pogo is a gift to the bands. In reality these are anachronistic punks in need of gigs. There are those who just come to spend the night and those who appreciate the bands playing. In any case, I don’t think that music should be the echo of violence. All this is tiresome and the opposite of motivating.

LIVING IN THE PARIS SUBURBS, DOES THAT BRING YOU CERTAIN THINGS? IS THIS A VERY ACTIVE REGION, AS ONE MIGHT THINK?

Yann: Nothing, absolutely nothing. Living in the Paris area just brings me one desire: to live in the countryside. People here are stressed, even crazy. There’s also concerts but they’re expensive and not very good really.

Yves: The Paris suburbs: it makes me laugh, we tested it with ‘Ivich’ (I was in that band). The concerts are generally expensive, not really hardcore and the audience is wrongheaded. Other than that, it’s great.

IN THE SONG «DRUGS» YOU DEAL WITH THE FACT THAT THEY ARE A FALSE SOLUTION. IS IT IMPORTANT FOR YOU TO SHARE THESE IDEAS? HOW DO YOU LOOK UPON THE BAD INTERPRETATIONS OF SxE AND ITS DERIVATIVES?

Yves: A question that I expected, as well as remarks in the style of ‘Are you straight-edge?’. Absolutely not, although it’s nothing to be embarrassed about, as some people seem to think. I wrote these lyrics simply because I read a book by a 15-year-old anonymous drug-addict (The Blue Grass), saw reports on TV or was confronted with this problem in other ways. The lyrics came by themselves. I needed to do this. I absolutely don’t criticise drug-addicts, because they’re not be condemned. I just regret that society brings people to see this as a way out. It’s revolting.

Yann: I share these ideas. I think that I have the right to say that taking drugs is an act of absurdity, as much as a drug-addict has the right to say the opposite. It’s something absurd and uninteresting. Drugs are an artificial and ephemeral paradise for those who seek a passion in their life. I also think that straight-edge has only very little to do with the initial movement. Some of their attitudes are sometimes stupid. But if one day I get labeled SxE because I don’t like pogo, as it has happened to me before, I’ll take it as a compliment. But what is ridiculous is that this movement that started from good ideas, turns into fashion. As soon as you don’t drink, don’t smoke or don’t take drugs, you’re labeled SxE.

I FIND THE DEMO-COVER AND THE BOOKLET SUPERB. WHO MADE THEM? AND DO THEY REPRESENT SOMETHING SPECIAL?

Yann: I took care of the booklet and the cover, because I like this creative/ornamental side. It has a meaning to me but it may be difficult to unexplain. To me it represents the relationships between people, the love for others. The drawings surrounding the lyrics come from a book of symbols. Maybe some people will find that it doesn’t mean anything, but for me it’s about the quest for peace of mind and for love.

DO YOU FIND AND DO YOU PLAY A LOT OF CONCERTS? DO YOU DEMAND GUARRANTEES OR OTHER THINGS?

We do some concerts. In fact, we play when we get an offer. We don’t ask for guarrantees because that’s stupid. We take what people give us. Out of a dozen concerts, we only got paid twice. The concerts help us to assert ourselves as a band. The emotions are always very strong for me. Performing during concerts is exciting because once the concert is over, you are anonymous amongst the others. This proves that everyone can do it. Stars don’t exist.

WHAT DID THE FIRST DEMO BRING YOU AND DID YOU DEVELOP A LOT SINCE?

Yes, we have evolved a lot since our first demo. When there were five of us, some things didn’t work out because the personalities didn’t stick (with ours). Now that there are just three of us, we take on our ideas differently than in the past. Nowadays we’re really united. This first demo was a step towards our maturity as it is today.

WHAT KIND OF THINGS DO YOU READ? (BOOKS / ZINES) HOW IMPORTANT ARE HARDCORE FANZINES TO YOU?

Yves: Our reading-tastes cover a wide range. I read ‘classics’ just as well as horror, biographies. On the other hand, I read very few zines, simply because I don’t have the opportunity very often and because I don’t care too much about the themes classic zines usually talk about. They’re always the same. Too bad, but they’re still the best way to promote new bands. We wellcome the arrival of Mr Christophe’s Stonehenge zine.

Yann: I read a lot of poetry and I write it too. Sometimes difficult to understand, but poetry allows you to show yourself to others, even if you’re often the only one to get the meaning of the poem. I don’t read a lot of zines either, although they remain important.

DO YOU HAVE RECORDING-PROJECTS, WISHES …?

Yann: We hope to be able to do an EP in the future. Passing on to vinyl is an idea that I’m very excited about. [Their first EP (I Can’t Stop Hating This Empty Space) was released on Laissez-Nous Jouer in ‘95]

WHAT, ACCORDING TO YOU, PREVENTS SINCERE AND COMMITTED HARDCORE TO REACH A LARGER AUDIENCE? IS IT HC ITSELF, THE APATHY OF PEOPLE IN GENERAL …? AND SHOULD IT DEVELOP?

Yann: Yes, it would have to develop, which is what’s happening nowadays. Maybe people are actually afraid of the sincerity and therefore boycott this kind of HardCore, but is it enough to stop its evolution. It’s too early to tell.

WHAT FILMS DID YOU LIKE BEST?

Yves: I like most of Alan Parker’s movies: Midnight Express, Birdy, Mississippi Burning. But also the film The Shinning with Jack Nicholson (very good), also Un Monde Sans Pitié with Hippolyte Girardot, and many comic films, they make you feel good.

Yann: I really like black-and-white films, silent movies: I find them to have a certain charm. I also like the films of Wim Wenders (Wings Of Desire [Der Himmel Über Berlin]). Recently, I saw a film about Antonin Arthaud [actor and writer] which I really liked. On the other hand, I don’t like TV in general.

ANY LAST WORDS?

Thank you for your precious help. One last word: people who want to say something with music should do it. It’s necessary that people who want to do concerts, actually go for it. Anyone can do it, so why is there so little initiative in France?

Besides that, I want to say hey to my friends: Nico, Christophe, Olivier, Norbert, Sullivan (and the others from ‘Undone’), Guillaume and the people from Orléans (in particular Michel). You see that zines are important!

Posted in 1994, French zines | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Rorschach (Let The Party Begin #2)

Søren Daugbjerg Jensen, from Ålborg (Denmark), did this zine. He was part of the 1000 Fryd (hardcore/punk venue) there and was in bands (guitar/vocals) such as ‘Hunchback International’, ‘Sons of Cain’ & ‘Married To A Murderer’ – with my mate Jakob Stig Nielsen (editor of Sorte Rose zine). The latter probably sent me a copy of #2. That, published in ‘92, contained interview with ‘Rorschach’ & ‘Abolition’, info on the Lynx (anti-fur) campaign and a few reviews. #3 (’94) was with ‘Born Against’, ‘Engage’, ‘Majority Of One’ & ‘A.P.P.L.E.’.

‘Rorschach’ toured Europe in 1992 with Charles Maggio (vocals; owner of Gern Blandsten), Thomas ‘Tommy’ Rusnak (bass, replacing first bassist Chris Laucella; later in ‘Ambush’), Andrew Gormley (drums; later in ‘Shai Hulud’) and ‘Bhakta’ Keith Huckins & Nick Forté (guitar). Sam McPheeters did an interview for Dear Jesus with them the year before…

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Dead Kennedys (A.P.B. #1)

Another donation/suggestion of Randy Smith. A.P.B. stands for “All Points Bulletin”, a police-term). A fanzine from Montreal, edited by Mike ‘Zabo’ Price (vocalist of ‘Genetic Control‘, gig-organiser & MRR-contributer), Andrew Campbell & Stuart Peterson (bassist of ‘My Dog Popper’). A one-off (1983). ‘A.P.B.‘ was also a hardcore band from Toronto that existed ’81-’83. The editorial speaks for itself…

A chat with the ‘Dead Kennedys’ – ‘Jello Biafra’ (Eric Boucher; vocals) / ‘Klaus Flouride’ (Geoffrey Lyall; bass) / ‘East Bay Ray’ (Raymond Pepperell; guitar) / ‘D.H. Peligro’ (Darren Henley; drums) around the time of Plastic Surgery Disasters…

Posted in 1983, Canadian zines | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment